Western Economic Diversification Canada
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Canada’s Economic Action Plan: Success in the West

Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) Projects in Western Canada

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As part of Canada’s Economic Action Plan (EAP), Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) has invested over $438 million towards more than 1,000 projects across the West. These projects are contributing to Canada’s economic recovery and creating jobs. Since July 2009, the EAP has helped to create over 650,000 jobs across Canada.

Through the Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) initiative, WD has provided almost $150 million in funds for the construction or improvement of recreational facilities in local communities across the West.

The following are two examples of RInC projects that are making a difference in western Canadian communities:

East Side Eagles Football Field – Winnipeg

East Side Eagles Football Field – Winnipeg

Young Winnipeg athletes are benefitting from the new turf on the only lighted amateur artificial turf field in Manitoba.

Winnipeg’s East Side Eagles Football Club received $212,000 in RInC funding to replace the turf on their outdoor field, the only lighted amateur artificial turf football field in Manitoba. The old turf was recycled and the project, completed three months ahead of schedule, provides a more user-friendly surface for younger players. In addition to football teams for players from ages seven to adult, the facility is used by amateur athletes in track and field, field hockey and lacrosse, and has hosted national and international tournaments. In all, the new 112,000 square foot field is used by more than 37,000 amateur athletes each year.

 

 

Edam Recreation Centre – Edam

Edam Recreation Centre – Edam

The new multi-purpose space linking the curling and skating rinks better serves the growing community’s needs.

The Village of Edam, with its unique 6.7 metre windmill, is known as a 'Little Bit of Holland in Saskatchewan' in honour of the Dutch settlers who were among the area’s original settlers in the early 1900’s. Today, the thriving community with a large service area has just completed a major renovation and expansion of its curling and skating rinks. The project, which received $500,000 in funding from RInC, includes an addition that connects the two buildings, creating a joint lobby that also serves as a community hall and emergency centre. New washroom and kitchen facilities, a repaired foundation and upgraded heating and electrical systems have improved energy efficiency, while ensuring the building is wheelchair accessible provides enhanced recreational opportunities for all area residents.